Science Communication:  Video Examples

As exciting as I find science and my research, I recognize not everyone is as keen.  Therefore,  I have enjoyed sharing my enthusiasm about science and nature with people in the community.

Professionally, I have given many lab tours, demonstrations, and talks to school groups through adults.  But I have also partaken in and led many activities where we bring insects and spiders to the public—for both children and adults. In addition, I have participated in science education for the public in activities like Bright Club Comedy and FameLab–or even the neighborhood children!

This page is intended to give a sampling of my experiences sharing biology with those around me.

What is Climate?

The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science 2018 Flame Challenge sets a competition for scientists to explain a topic to an 11-year old.  I entered the video competitions, results announced in Spring 2018.  In this video I travel all over California and to Sweden explaining “Climate” in a way that entertains while educates.

Outreach Tour

As part of my regular practices, I show students and adults how we do recordings in the field.  This is an example of an outreach event–to high school students.

Bright Club Comedy

In 2013 I participated in bringing science to the stage…at a bar…in Glasgow, Scotland.

This is a comedy set I put together about spider sex and insect hearing.

Fame Lab

Fame Lab is an international organization that teaches people to effectively communicate science to a broad audience. In 2011, I participated in the Scotland heat, making it to the finals round. I strive to continually improve how I can reach people of all ages and backgrounds and the training from FameLab has helped me recognize how to keep it simple and fun.

Every Day Outreach

I enjoy teaching children advanced tidbits of science whenever I can. For example, in New Hampshire, the neighborhood children were excited by my moth collecting and what flies at night.  So, I shared my enthusiasm and taught one 5-year old child about moths, hearing to avoid bats, and how to tell if it is a male moth (by looking for fanned antennae). She drew me a picture of a Luna Moth we saw at her light one night–even remembering to draw it as a male!

In addition, years I have participated in many outreach activities where I bring insects and spiders to the public to teach them and let them handle live animals. These events include activities such as: S.O.S. Day—Scary Oozy Slimy, Charlotte’s Web Spider outreach, ‘Eat a Bug’ lunch, and booths at university and nature center events.  I have also been a summer camp’s naturalist teaching ages 4-14 the fun niches in their backyard.